Labor & Employment

EEOC Announces New EEO-1 Pay Data Reporting Deadline

April 12, 2019
By Sarah L. Nash
September 30, 2019, marks the newly announced deadline for employers who submit annual EEO-1 reports to report employee 2018 pay data to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The EEOC revealed the new deadline in a federal court submission last week. The judge in the case will still need to approve of the EEOC's plan before it becomes the official cutoff date.
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Misclassifying Employees Can Have Major Consequences

March 21, 2019
By Anthony M. Batt
Today's economy is saturated with new ways to earn money without being subject to a set schedule or traditional employer demands. With so many individuals working part-time jobs with more autonomy than ever, companies are struggling to determine whether to classify those workers as independent contractors or employees. The distinction between those two categories is extremely important and can affect all aspects of your business, including benefits, overtime pay, and workers' compensation.
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Buyer Beware: Outsourcing Labor Puts You at Risk of Prevailing Wage Violations

March 11, 2019
By Nichole D. Atallah
Recently, a Department of Labor (DOL) investigation found that four federal contractors were responsible for paying 53 current and former employees a total of $255,474 for violating the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts (DBRA). DOL determined the contractors failed to pay the correct prevailing wages and fringe benefits. In this case, the prime contractor subcontracted with a temporary staffing company that failed to pay cleaning service crews in accordance with DBRA requirements. The temporary employees were misclassified and not paid the required prevailing wage rates. Another subcontractor also failed to pay the correct fringe benefits. Due to the repeated and willful nature of these violations, one of the contractors and its owner have been declared ineligible to bid on federal DBRA contracts for a period of 3 years.
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Is Cyber Insurance Worthless in the Age of Quasi-State-Sponsored Hacking?

March 8, 2019
By Isaias Alba IV
I'm sure everyone has heard it before: commentators, pundits, and even members of the 809 Panel have stated that "we are at war!" Most of these claims revolve less around ground combat or air battles than the fact that more countries are investing in and deploying cyber assets to destroy not just the defense networks of other countries, but their economic systems as well. Thus, it stands to reason that some of the cyber threats seen in the wild are not just from random hackers in basements or dark apartments, but from state actors or quasi-state actors operating directly or indirectly at the behest of governments. Further, there are even more hackers working for terrorist organizations criminal enterprises financially connected to terror organizations, or "lone wolf" actors whose motives some would contend to be "terrorist" in nature. This fact runs headlong into a provision contained in many cyber insurance contracts that state the insurer does not have to pay for incidents caused by an "act of war" or "act of terror." It is this very exclusion that is at play in recent a multi-million dollar lawsuit. Specifically, if the insurance company defendant prevails and more insurers attempt to use this exception to avoid paying for damages caused by malware suspected of being tied to state actors or terrorist organizations, cyber insurance could become virtually worthless.
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In the Weeds: Testing Federal Contractor Employees for Marijuana Use

January 31, 2019
By Sarah L. Nash
Consider the following scenario: Janie is employed as a help desk clerk to perform work on a federal government contract and is a model employee. She has a perfect attendance record, performs her job responsibilities with enthusiasm, and is always a team player. Pursuant to company policy, one day Janie is subjected to a random drug test. The results show she tested positive for THC, consistent with the use of marijuana. What options does her employer have?
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