Cybersecurity & Data Privacy

BLOG: The Relationship Between Privacy and Trust

April 17, 2019
By David T. Shafer
Recently, there has been an advertisement running during March Madness from Apple that is all about privacy. If your household has been watching as much college basketball as mine has, then you've likely seen it. It's a minute full of real-world examples of how people value their personal privacy. None of those examples are particularly significant but, in the aggregate, it shows that this remains an issue that people are deeply concerned about. That concern, of course, is then applied to technology. In the ad, it is an iPhone. In your business, it is your e-mail server, your website, your social media presence and the computer and phones your business uses to conduct its business.
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When Cybersecurity Is a Hot Topic, GSA Expands Its Cybersecurity Service Offerings

April 12, 2019
By Emily J. Rouleau
The General Services Administration (GSA) recently expanded its cybersecurity service offerings for federal, state, and local governments. Specifically, GSA worked in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security and the Office of Management and Budget to develop IT Schedule 70's Highly Adaptive Cybersecurity Services (HACS) Special Item Number (SIN) 132-45 to make it easier for agencies to procure quality cybersecurity services.
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Cybersecurity's Increasing Impact on Prime Contract and Subcontract Awards

April 5, 2019
By Jonathan Williams
Since last year, I have been writing about the increasing impact of cybersecurity on contract awards. DoD has issued guidance on how it will evaluate system security plans, and it has indicated that, along with cost, schedule, and performance, cybersecurity is the "fourth pillar" of its acquisitions. As a result, contractors need to shift their view of cybersecurity compliance as a cost center to a business driver and an increasingly important factor in gaining a competitive advantage.
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Is Cyber Insurance Worthless in the Age of Quasi-State-Sponsored Hacking?

March 8, 2019
By Isaias Alba IV
I'm sure everyone has heard it before: commentators, pundits, and even members of the 809 Panel have stated that "we are at war!" Most of these claims revolve less around ground combat or air battles than the fact that more countries are investing in and deploying cyber assets to destroy not just the defense networks of other countries, but their economic systems as well. Thus, it stands to reason that some of the cyber threats seen in the wild are not just from random hackers in basements or dark apartments, but from state actors or quasi-state actors operating directly or indirectly at the behest of governments. Further, there are even more hackers working for terrorist organizations criminal enterprises financially connected to terror organizations, or "lone wolf" actors whose motives some would contend to be "terrorist" in nature. This fact runs headlong into a provision contained in many cyber insurance contracts that state the insurer does not have to pay for incidents caused by an "act of war" or "act of terror." It is this very exclusion that is at play in recent a multi-million dollar lawsuit. Specifically, if the insurance company defendant prevails and more insurers attempt to use this exception to avoid paying for damages caused by malware suspected of being tied to state actors or terrorist organizations, cyber insurance could become virtually worthless.
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